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Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Rare Book & Manuscript Library,  LJS 342
Description: ff. i + 43 + i - Contemporary leather wallet binding with restored strap but lacking buckle; inside of flap marked Carta 123 - Sold at auction at Christie's, 29 Nov. 1999, lot 8, to Lawrence J. Schoenberg. Gift of Lawrence J. Schoenberg and Barbara Brizdle, 2011 - Described in Transformation of knowledge: early manuscripts from the collection of Lawrence J. Schoenberg (London: Paul Holberton, 2006), p. 149
Number of Parts: 1 - Number of Images Available: 0
Direct Link: http://ds.lib.berkeley.edu/LJS342_27
Language: Latin Century: 15th

Part 1: ff. 1-43
Description: - Parchment - 186 mm x 138 mm - 27 long lines; vertical bounding lines ruled in lead, horizontal lines in text block ruled in faint ink
Country: Cardinal point:
Region: City: Milan
Assigned Date: s. XV2Searchable Date Range: 1450 - 1499
Dated by scribe: NoInscribed Date:
Document: YesNumber of Scribes:
Notes: Latin
Number of Texts: 1

Text 1: ff. 1r-43r
Title: Collection of documents
Language(s): Latin
Notes: Copies of 9 documents relating to the illicit use of water and diversion of waterways in the territory of Milan, presumably to compile evidence of the legal status of these assets. The first 8, copies of documents originally written in 1382 to 1386, are from the correspondence of Blanche of Savoy, widow of Galeazzo II Visconti, and their son Giangaleazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan, first requesting that the Vicarius of Milan forbid the diversion of water and sue those having diverted water from the Rugia Sancti Columbani (San Colombano) and its tributary the Modio, and then recounting the proceedings of the ensuing lawsuits. The seventh and eighth documents have copies of notarial signets (f. 37v, 39r). The last document (f. 39v-43r) is a decree of Duke Filippo Maria Visconti dated 18 April 1444 prohibiting diversion of rivers and canals without permission. It begins with a note explaining that it was found at the Officium statutorum (f. 39v). The copies appear all to have been written at roughly the same time