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Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, Lilly Library at Indiana University,  Poole 136
Description: One leaf - Not bound. - Cistercian abbey of Cambron, north of Mons, Hainault (now in Belgium), founded c. 1148; doubtless the Gilebertus . . . Super Epistolas Paulirecorded at Cambron in 1641 and the gillebertus Super epistolas Sti Pauli Completerecorded at Cambron in 1782 (Sanderus 1641, I, p. 355; Planke 1938, p. 55, no. 168); the abbey was suppressed in 1789 and the monks finally left in 1797; at least 34 manuscripts from Cambron were bought c. 1823 from P. J. De Mat (d. 1828), bookseller in Brussels, by Sir Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872), his MSS 333-62 and 4765-68, together with an unknown number of fragments; from the collection of specimen leaves formed by Messrs. W. H. Robinson, who bought the residue of the Phillipps library in 1945-6, sold by them to George A. Poole in 1947, and acquired by the Lilly Library with the Poole Collection in 1958. - De Hamel 2004, p. 39, no. 12b.
Notes:-The manuscript represented by Poole 136 was already out of date when it was made. The arrangement of the pages, with successive column-width blocks of text, alternating the biblical (in large script) and the Gloss or commentary (in smaller script), is apparently unique among copies of Gilbert de la Porrée. It was invented around 1160 for Peter Lombard’s Magna glossatura (as in nos. 21 and 27 below), and so the manuscript here has the odd feature of being an archaic text in the format of its successor.
Number of Parts: 1 - Number of Images Available: 4
Direct Link: http://ds.lib.berkeley.edu/Poole136_40
Language: Latin Country: France? Century: 12th

Part 1: One leaf
Description: - Parchment - 343 x 241 mm - 2 columns, ruled in plummet for 53 lines but the text broken into consecutive blocks of text (written on alternate ruled lines) and commentary (written on the ruled lines themselves), each column 243 mm. by 70 mm. with 8 mm. between columns, prickings in outer margins. The manuscript represented by Poole 136 was already out of date when it was made. The arrangement of the pages, with successive column-width blocks of text, alternating the biblical (in large script) and the Gloss or commentary (in smaller script), is apparently unique among copies of Gilbert de la Porrée. It was invented around 1160 for Peter Lombard’s Magna glossatura (as in nos. 21 and 27 below), and so the manuscript here has the odd feature of being an archaic text in the format of its successor.
Country: France?Cardinal point: northern
Region: City:
Assigned Date: s. XII2Searchable Date Range: 1150 - 1199
Dated by scribe: NoInscribed Date:
Document: NoNumber of Scribes:
Script: Proto-gothic Textura, square; two sizes
Figurative Decoration: ‘P’ ('Paulus et), 166 mm. by 30 mm. with a full-width panel enclosing the opening words of the text, initial includes an ostrich holding a snake.
Other Decoration: Biblical lemmata in the commentary underlined in red, running-titles, chapter numbers and small initials in text alternately in red and blue; two large illuminated initials on verso, ‘P’ (Philipenses), 62 mm. by 25 mm., and ‘P’ ('Paulus et), 166 mm. by 30 mm. with a full-width panel enclosing the opening words of the text, all illuminated in colours and burnished gold.
Notes: The use of gold is not characteristic of Cistercian book production, and the opulence of the manuscript is not typical of the manuscripts assumed to have been decorated in Cambron itself, as described by Glorieux-De Gand 1990b. The book is likely to have been made elsewhere, perhaps in France, and acquired by Cambron after it was written. Tiny sewing-holes beside and above the initials indicate that they were once protected by textile flaps. The large initial here shows an ostrich holding in its beak what appears to be a snake. The snake may be a visual misunderstanding of a horseshoe, with which ostriches were often shown in medieval heraldry, because they were reputed to eat iron. The unusual subject has a specific relevance to Philippians. The twelfth-century Bestiary text recounts that ostriches forget where they have laid their eggs. It explains this trait as being a symbol of the Christian who should forget earthly matters and focus instead on the prize of the higher calling, “ad bravium supernae vocationis”, in Latin (Barber 1999, p. 138). That is a direct quotation from Philippians 3: 14. Latin
Number of Texts: 1

Text 1: One leaf
Author: Gilbert de la Porrée
Title: Media Glossatura in Epistolas Pauli
Title: Biblical Commentary
Language(s): Latin
Notes: The leaf opens in the biblical reading for Ephesians 6: 7, followed by the prologue to Philippians (Stegmüller no. 728) and the text of Philippians to 1: 4, all interspersed with the Media glossatura. At least eight detached leaves from the manuscript were in the Phillipps collection, all with illuminated initials. In their original sequence, they are: 1, opening of Romans (Stegmüller no. 2515), now Oxford, Bodleian, MS Lat. misc. a.3, fol. 26; 2, end of Romans, beginning of I Corinthians (Stegmüller no. 2516), now Tokyo, Takamiya collection, MS 45, no.12; 3, end of II Corinthians and beginning of Galatians (Stegmüller no. 2518), now Tokyo, Takamiya Collection, MS 45, no. 25; 4, end of Galatians and beginning of Ephesians (Stegmüller no. 2519), most recently Neil Phillips sale, Sotheby’s, 2 December 1997, lot 46; 5, end of Ephesians and beginning of Philippians (Stegmüller no. 2520), the present leaf; 6, end of Philippians and beginning of Colossians (Stegmüller no. 2521), now Tokyo, Takamiya Collection, MS 45, no. 26; 7,end of I Thessalonians and beginning of II Thessalonians (Stegmüller no. 2523), most recently Maggs, cat. 1002, Western Text Hands, 1980, no. 53; and 8, end of Philemon and beginning of Hebrews (Stegmüller no. 2528), most recently H. F. Jossi sale, Sotheby’s, 4 December 2007, part of lot 17. 
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recto   Two large illuminated initials ‘P’ ("Philipenses"), 62 mm. by 25 mm., and ‘P’ ("Paulus et"), 166 mm. by 30 mm. with a full-width panel enclosing the opening words of the text, all illuminated in colors and burnished gold.
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verso   Written in two sizes of a rather square protogothic textura, biblical lemmata in the commentary underlined in red, running-titles, chapter numbers and small initials in text alternately in red and blue.
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recto   [No Title for Display]
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verso   [No Title for Display]
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